Modern Western Studies at the New Stage of the World Order Crisis

221
DOI: 10.20542/0131-2227-2020-64-4-96-105
Sh. Shakhalilov (timur7628@mail.ru), 
Lomonosov Moscow State University, GSP 1, Leninskie Gory, Moscow, 119991, Russian Federation

Abstract. The problems faced by the world order, possible ways for their solution are disclosed in the latest Western political studies. The analysis of them has allowed to reveal changes in the researchers’ views on the liberal order, ways for its dissemination throughout the world, prospects for the transformations which have happened under the influence of the changed international situation. The experts are concerned with the erosion of the world order, insist that it retreats in the face of authoritarianism, populism and nationalism, and is under a threat. The understanding is growing up to consider the whole complex of external and internal factors affecting the order as this is the only way to respond to the facing challenges. Among the causes of the liberal order crisis the analysts mark out negative consequences of globalization: increase in the number of losers all over the world and in the Western countries, strengthening of nationalist sentiments in Asia and Europe, growth of disparities between developed and developing countries. Western authors have different assessments concerning the cause of the liberal order problems, measures for getting it out of crisis. Among the measures suggested there are the international institutions reformation (more countries should be engaged into their management structures), recognition of the national sovereignty value, establishing of conditions for cooperation between liberal democracies and authoritarian regimes. However, the reforms proposed have a half-way character and miscalculate their own political and economic consequences. The analysis of the viewpoints concerning the world order future, which exist within the Western expert societies, has allowed to select three possible scenarios for the crisis situation solution and determine the most probable one. 

Keywords: world order, liberal internationalism, realism, globalization, nationalism, world powers, USA


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For citation:
Shakhalilov S. Modern Western Studies at the New Stage of the World Order Crisis. World Eonomy and International Relations, 2020, vol. 64, no. 4, pp. 96-105. https://doi.org/10.20542/0131-2227-2020-64-4-96-105



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