Beyond stalemate in Afghanistan

Beyond stalemate in Afghanistan
// Pathways to Peace and Security. 2017. no 1(52) Special Issue: ADDRESSING TERRORISM, VIOLENT EXTREMISM AND RADICALIZATION (perspectives from Russia and the United States). Edited by Ekaterina Stepanova,. P. 244-251


DOI: 10.20542/2307-1494-2017-1-244-250


Abstract

For the first time since 2001, Afghanistan and all regional powers agree in principle to include the Taliban in a peace process. That remains U.S. policy as well, though the Trump administration is yet to review or reaffirm it. The U.S. could decide that stability or peace in Afghanistan are unattainable, and that the best option would be to maintain a platform in Afghanistan to fight terrorism. The regional economic transformations, however, raise the cost of that stalemate to Afghanistan’s neighbors who might welcome U.S. participation with them in a stabilization or peace process, as long as it leads to the eventual parture of U.S. troops rather than their entrenchment in the region. If success in Afghanistan means stabilization, the way to achieve it would be a diplomatic strategy to transition from a U.S. military presence in Afghanistan to a regionally supported political settlement that eliminates the need for that presence.


Keywords

Afghanistan, United States, Pakistan, Iran, China, India, Russia, Central Asia, “The Belt and Road Initiative”, regional cooperation, Afghan peace process, Taliban, Islamic State


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For citation:

Rubin B. Beyond stalemate in Afghanistan. Pathways to Peace and Security, 2017, no 1(52) Special Issue: ADDRESSING TERRORISM, VIOLENT EXTREMISM AND RADICALIZATION (perspectives from Russia and the United States). Edited by Ekaterina Stepanova,, pp. 244-251. DOI: 10.20542/2307-1494-2017-1-244-250